Wednesday, June 28, 2006

The Unfolding of Language

I am 100 pages into a marvelous book I thought you might be interested in:
 
The Unfolding of Language by Guy Deutscher
 
Synopsis
'Language is mankind's greatest invention - except of course, that it was never invented.' So begins Guy Deutscher's enthralling investigation into the evolution of language. No one believes that the Roman Senate sat down one day to design the complex system that is Latin grammar, and few believe, these days, in the literal truth of the story of the Tower of Babel. But then how did there come to be so many languages, and of such elaborate design? If we started off with rudimentary utterances on the level of 'man throw spear', how did we end up with sophisticated grammars, enormous vocabularies, and intricately nuanced shades of meaning? Drawing on recent, groundbreaking discoveries in modern linguistics, Deutscher exposes the elusive forces of creation at work in human communication. Along the way, we learn why German maidens are neuter while German turnips are female, why we have feet not foots, and how great changes of pronunciation may result from simple laziness...
 
 
I've learned such fabulous things as the Semitic languages' noun stems and the fact that 'not' is equivalent to the 'pas' in French's 'ne...pas' and originally wasn't a negater at all!
 
I am absolutely loving it and am actually excited when I get a chance to take time and read more.  It's right up there with three of my other favourite books I can't recommend enough:
 
 
The Power of Babel: A Natural History of Language by John H. McWhorter
 
Amazon.co.uk Review
In his enormously ambitious book The Power of Babel, John McWhorter offers an account of the first common language ever spoken by human beings, and proceeds to explore why it then fragmented into the 6,000 languages that are spoken today across the globe. As Professor of Linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley, McWhorter is perfectly qualified to provide a witty and accessible guide to his subject. As he puts it, "the process by which one original language has developed into six thousand is a rich and fascinating one, incorporating not only findings from linguistic theory but also geography, history, sociology. It is this fascinating story that I will share with you in this book."
 
 
Mother Tongue by Bill Bryson (Quite possibly my favourite book ever.)
 
Amazon.co.uk Review
Who would have thought that a book about the English language would be so entertaining? Certainly not this grammar-allergic reviewer, but The Mother Tongue pulls it off admirably. Bill Bryson--a zealot--is the right man for the job. Who else could rhapsodise about "the colourless murmur of the schwa" with a straight face? It is his unflagging enthusiasm, seeping from between every sentence, that carries the book.

Bryson displays an encyclopedic knowledge of his topic, and this inevitably encourages a light tone; the more you know about a subject, the more absurd it becomes. No jokes are necessary, the facts do well enough by themselves, and Bryson supplies tens per page. As well as tossing off gems of fractured English (from a Japanese eraser: "This product will self- destruct in Mother Earth."), Bryson frequently takes time to compare the idiosyncratic tongue with other languages. Not only does this give a laugh (one word: Welsh), and always shed considerable light, it also makes the reader feel fortunate to speak English.

Synopsis
A witty, irreverent but very useful account of the peculiarities of the English language. This book is designed to appeal to all lovers of language and history. The author also wrote "The Lost Continent", "Book of Blunders" and "Dictionary of Troublesome Words". "Mother Tongue" should appeal to all lovers of language and history and also those with a sense of humour.

and its American expansion:
 
Made in America by Bill Bryson
 
Amazon.co.uk Review
Bill Bryson's "Informal History of the English Language in the United States" is, in a word, fascinating. After reading this tour de force, it's clear that a nation's language speaks volumes about its true character: you are what you speak. Bryson traces America's history through the language of the time, then goes on to discuss words culled from everyday activities: immigration, eating, shopping, advertising, going to the movies, and others.

Made in America will supply you with interesting facts and cocktail chatter for a year or more. Did you know, for example, that Teddy Roosevelt's "speak softly and carry a big stick" credo has its roots in a West African proverb? Or that actor Walter Matthau's given name is Walter Mattaschanskayasky? Or that the supposedly frigid Puritans--who called themselves "Saints," by the way--had something called a pre-contract, which was a license for premarital sex? Made in America is an excellent discussion of American English, but what makes the book such a treasure is that it offers much, much more.

Synopsis
An entertaining, anecdotal look at the origins of language and ideas in the USA. Bryson explains why two bicycle repairmen from Ohio succeeded in mastering manned flight, why the assassination of President Garfield led to the invention of air conditioning, and many other improbable but true facts.


So buy them and read so we can discuss ad nauseum.

 
Cheers,
Shaun

Sunday, June 11, 2006

[The Life of Shaun #53] Shaun's a Mary, quite contrary, how does his garden grow?

This past Thursday, Natasha and I planned and successfully carried out a coup.  As you may remember, our complex has that most English of amenities, a private garden.  But we weren't given keys because, also very English, we're not the right class; we're renters, not owners.  As the Summer has sprang upon us with a vengeance we decided we must get a key.

So we invited the neighbor we're friendliest with, Alister, for wine.  And boy was wine had!  Six bottles split amongst three.  A nice follow-up to Natasha's and my anniversary celebration the Monday before where we had four split amongst two.  But I digress.

Anyway, expertly laid out in the middle of all this., Natasha made an off-handed comment about us not being given keys and Alister offered to get us a copy, no prodding needed!  She's a brilliant lady, my Natasha.

So we're off now to celebrate with a bottle of cold prosecco in the hot sun.  In our private garden.  Bless.

Cheers,
Shaun

--
Shaun Coley
scoley@gmail.com
http://www.friendster.com/profiles/shaunism
London, UK
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Thursday, June 08, 2006

[The Life of Shaun #52] Italia

Here are pics from Sean's and my trip to Italy, if you're interested:

http://uk.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/shaunec1/album?.dir=/a9b3re2&.src=ph&.tok=phNBp_EBWiZAB2dD

Cheers,
Shaun

--
Shaun Coley
scoley@gmail.com
http://www.friendster.com/profiles/shaunism
London, UK


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